SOUNDSCAPE

Did you come enjoy a beautiful day outside in East Austin this weekend at the artGATHER SOUNDSCAPE event? If not, then you missed out. artMEAT gathered four extremely talented music acts, a rag tag group of Austinites, and some artists hawking their wares to form this glorious event. Guests enjoyed some smooth stylings to go along with their brunch at Cherrywood Coffeehouse and then rocked out in the afternoon while enjoying several pomegranate ciders. There were dogs, kids, and the rarest thing of all - musicians out in the daylight.

 The event was emceed by the amazingly talented Amber Quick & Miles Chick.

The event was emceed by the amazingly talented Amber Quick & Miles Chick.

The event marked the launch of the artGLOSS issue #1.1 "Never Have I Ever Issue." This zine features mixed media visual and literary works from people across the country and Canada.

We would like to thank all of the artists who shared their incredible talents with us. We were graced with the presence of Jefferson Lam, Dova, Sass & the Couchmen, and Goodnight Ghost.

For a full gallery of photos, please click the button below. Want to make sure you don't miss any upcoming artMEAT creative happenings around town? Sign up for our mailing list. Come hang with the artGANG!

CrEATively Yours,

K

artGLOSS issue #1.1 is coming your way!

We are very excited to announce that artGLOSS issue 1.1 - "Never Have I Ever" is off to the printers!

The collection of work we have received from our contributors exceeded all of our expectations for this issue. We received works from across the country and one from Canada! You are not going to want to wait to get your hands on a copy of this issue.

The zine will be available electronically on our website starting this weekend. If you would prefer to get a hard copy and want to come hang with the artGANG, come visit us at our SOUNDSCAPE event this Saturday, April 23rd from 12-4pm.

Want to get a hard copy and live outside of the Austin area? The zine will be made available on our artMART starting this weekend. We will also have some artSWAG that you will not want to miss. Thank you all for making this process so fun and collaborative. See you soon!

Your taxes are done, come celebrate at Soundscape!

Join us for our second artGATHER event on Saturday, April 23rd - SOUNDSCAPE!

SOUNDSCAPE is an Austin based artistic happening commemorating the launch of our "Never Have I Ever" artGLOSS issue. 

SOUNDSCAPE will feature local Austin music acts, live visual artists at work, and creative goodies. This event is going down at Cherrywood Coffeehouse from 12-4pm on Saturday, April 23rd.

We welcome families, dogs, friends, out-of-towners, teetotalers, somnambulists, and coffee drinkers looking for some visual stimulation to go along with their caffeine buzz. It is going to be a spectacular occasion centered around what Austin does best - live music and celebrating the arts. Here is a run down of the lineup for the event:

- Jefferson Lam - 12:15pm - 12:45pm

Alan Cordova - 1:00pm - 1:45pm

Sass & the Couchmen - 2:00pm - 2:45pm

- Goodnight Ghost - 3:00pm - 3:45pm

Come join us celebrate these great Austin acts! This is not going to be something you want to miss. If you are not located in the Austin area, look for us on periscope!

 See you there!

K

Postponing the reading of "Keely & Du"

It is with a heavy heart and grueling deliberation that we inform you that we are postponing the artGRASP reading of "Keely & Du."

We would like to take this time to explain the reasoning behind postponing. As you may have heard a first year female student at UT was murdered quite recently, and the specific details of this horrific crime were just revealed this week.

In light of these recent discoveries, we believe the content of this play may exacerbate the wounds already opened by this incident. While this story and discourse may have an important role in exploring/understanding this kind of darkness, it is clear to us that UT's community deserves a few more moments to heal. We offer our condolences for this loss.

Again, we are so very sorry and hope that you will be able to participate in a reading of this play in the future. We would also like to invite you to join us for the new kickoff date of artGRASP, on Saturday, May 1st, where we will be reading "Rapture, Blister, Burn" from 7-10pm.

Female Centric Symposiums

We are happy to announce our very first artGRASP series!

What is artGRASP?

artGRASP is the catalyst for our creative and cultural connectivity. 

artGRASP shall be the haven under which we share knowledge, experiences, and fortify bonds that make us better thinkers, artists, and humans. 

artGRASP seeks to offer creative outlets and structure for those with limited experience or access. 

artGRASP is an array of art-centric workshops /symposiums that are built around a creative course load. They are aimed to give both novice instructors and neophyte creatives a chance to cultivate their talents and/or share in a meaningful public dialogue.

The first artGRASP session will be a series of play reading/symposiums focusing on dynamic female voices and narratives. The first symposium will take place on Sunday, May 1st from 7-10pm at the Dozen Street Bar. We will be reading "Rapture, Blister, Burn" by Gina Gionfriddo, with a discussion to follow.

If you would like to join us, please sign up below. If you are unable to make it on May 1st, keep your eyes on the artGRASP page for the next dates in the series. See you there! 

Name *
Name
Interested in Attending? *

The artGANG goes on an Adventure!

As the artGANG works to expand, we reached out to the Thinkery, a children's museum in Austin. The Thinkery strives to create innovative learning experiences to equip and inspire the next generation of creative problem solvers. We support their mission and wanted to know how artMEAT could help. They informed us about their Thinkery21 events and invited us to attend one dedicated to exploring our senses, to see if we may want to get involved in the future.

The "Come to Your Senses" event was remarkable. Having free reign in a museum and not having to worry about stepping on a child is awesome. Getting to explore different senses through an almost endless amount of experiments and activities was exhilarating. The added variety of beer, wine, and cocktails choices at the bars scattered throughout the event was the cherry on top. The wide range of activities included something for everyone.

Shelby got to see if she could tell the difference between different kinds of fruit in a blind taste test.

Kyle got to test his throwing skills while wearing goggles that simulate being intoxicated. Spoiler alert: he was very good at functioning while "drunk."

Delanté and Kyle got to explore how insensitive the skin on your arms and the back of your hands is in comparison to your fingertips.

I got a treat when I climbed through a jungle gym without having to scale any small children.

And finally, no artMEAT adventure would be complete without some dancing! The next Thinkery21 event will be held on June 2nd from 7-10pm. They will be exploring math with their theme, "Strength in Numbers." Stay tuned for more details about a potential artMEAT/Thinkery collaboration.

CrEATively Yours,

K

Art Imitating Life

Today we celebrate some real Bad Ass B*%^ches in honor of Women Crush Wednesday. Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer are the amazingly talented duo who created the Comedy Central smash hit, Broad City. Abbi and Ilana have created a hilarious show about the crazy adventures two strong women in their 20s can get into in NYC.

Abbi's character, Abbi Abrams, is a struggling artist who works at a gym to make ends meet. Many of the stories used in the show are from Abbi's real life struggles to sell her art before she moved into the comedy world. Huffington Post recently discovered that Abbi used to work as an artist for AOL. Ilana's character,  Ilana Wexler, is a free spirited individual who spends her days, until recently, working at a Groupon like company called "Deals, Deals, Deals." They have said in past interviews that the situations she faces at Deals, Deals, Deals are largely drawn from the time she spent working at a call center.

 Artwork by Abbi Jacobson for AOL.

Artwork by Abbi Jacobson for AOL.

These amazing woman have turned their every day struggles into comedy gold and for that we say, "Yasss Queen!" Keep breaking down those comedy barriers! These are definitely two amazing women we would want to have a drink with!

CrEATively Yours,

K

“Art is serious business for Canadians!”

Happy Monday artMEAT gang! To get us through the rest of this work day, let us take a break to celebrate today's Man Crush Monday. The votes are in and the winner by a landslide is: Justin Trudeau! The Canadian Prime Minister is not only adorable, but is also a strong feminist and a champion of the arts. Check out this yoga pose:

Last month, he supported a huge increase to the Canadian Council for the Arts budget. This encouraged Canadian Council Director and CEO Simon Brault to say, "Art is serious business for Canadians." Our hats are off to you Prime Minister!

CrEATively Yours,

K

Devour Your Art Today!

The team here at artMEAT is proud to announce a new collection for the artMEAT artMART!

Carnivorous Culture

This collection will feature fantastic modern art, fashion, and housewares made completely out of meat. Be the first on your block with your very own pig made out of pig! It is so meta! 

 Artwork by: Lieutenant Ham

Artwork by: Lieutenant Ham

Don't let Lady Gaga have all of the fun! Go on and rock your very own meat dress!

 Designed by: Kevin Bacon

Designed by: Kevin Bacon

Love bacon wrapped everything? In this chair you will be dozing with visions of meatballs dancing in your head before you know it! Buy today and get a side of couch potatoes for free!

 Furniture by: Crate & Bacon

Furniture by: Crate & Bacon

Want to send a special message to a certain someone? The quickest way to their heart is through their stomach.

 Font by: Helvetica Hamburger

Font by: Helvetica Hamburger

Don't let these artisanal pieces linger in the sun too long! Grab your charcoal and order today!

Brought to You by Forks Over Knives.

CrEATively Yours,

K

#TransIsBeautiful

Today, in celebration of the Transgender Day of Visibility we would like to support the trans community. This day is about sharing stories of trans people around the world to fight transphobia through exposure. The theme for this year is #MoreThanVisibility.

Jake Graf, the writer and director of The Danish Girl, made a video in celebration of the Transgender Day of Visibility. The video includes cameos from model and activist Laith Ashley and Captain Hannah Winterbourne, the highest ranking transgender officer in the British Army. The video covers their fears, insecurities, and advice for the younger transgender community.1]

Watch it here: 

Now go out and celebrate!

CrEATively Yours,

K

[1] http://www.out.com/popnography/2016/3/31/transgender-day-of-visibility

The Art of Everyone

As we explore new ways to incorporate art into everyday life, we would like to share art of different cultures. The art of your ancestors may be something you think about very little on a day to day basis. You may not live in the same place as your past generations so you may rarely see your culture celebrated in your neck of the woods. Most places cherish their local heritage through museums and cultural festivals. Even if your unique heritage is not the same as the local one being celebrated, we would encourage you to go out and explore it. Learn more about the people who walked the same ground beneath you. Think about their stories, their struggles, and their everyday life. This knowledge combined with what you know and can learn about your own unique past can enrich your life. We never know where we are going until we know where we have been.


Russia

Early Russian works centered on Icon Paintings. These painters wanted to share God’s doctrine. The first major icon associated with Christianity was Jesus. The most famous piece from this time was called the “Holy Face.” It is also referred to as “Veronica’s Veil” based on its origin story. It was said to have been imprinted by Christ himself. These icons were thought to heal and work miracles.

 "The Holy Face"

"The Holy Face"

Starting in the middle of the 16th century, Russian paintings start to become influenced by Western European culture. During this period, Stroganov’s school was established. This work focused mostly on the tsar’s court masters. These pieces were created to be decorative and pretty. In the second half of the 17th century oil paints, light and shade modeling, and a greater focus on people and nature became en vogue. Simon Ushakov is one of the most famous artists of this time. Secular works began to appear during this time.

As we move into the 18th and early 19th centuries, paintings began to embrace all stages of Western art. Foreign painters and sculptors were invited to Russia and highly skilled domestic masters were formed. Academism was very trendy and involved austerity of drawing, strict rules of composition, and conventionality of palette. The greatest accolades during this period were given to portraits. The major Russian master to emerge from this time was F. Shubin.

 E.M. Chulkov by F. Shubin

E.M. Chulkov by F. Shubin

In the late 18th century there became an increased interest in folk life. This turned to a trend to paint national themes involving historic and military paintings. This was the time when the first national galleries were created. Russian artists began to be recognized around the world at international exhibitions and foreign art shows. Landscape painting became extremely popular and impressionism began to influence Russian works.

 "The Taking of the Snow Town," V. Surikov,

"The Taking of the Snow Town," V. Surikov,

By the 1910s, Russian avant-garde works began influencing the rest of the world. Artists were working to transfigure the very basics of art itself. New schools and trends were created as this art was developed. The improvisational style and abstractionism created by V. Kandinsky were probably the most famous. Many artists took on the task of constructing material space for the creation of logical and functional forms. This led to many changes in industrial design.

 "Composition VI," V. Kandinsky

"Composition VI," V. Kandinsky

By the 1930s avant-garde artists were running into issues caused by Soviet ideological pressure. Many artists of the time tried to combine realistic traditions with achievements of modern artists. In the 1960s there was a revival of Russian avant-garde. Some explored previous principles while others created new ones like conceptualism. [1]

 "The Palace of Projects," Ilya Kabakov

"The Palace of Projects," Ilya Kabakov


Thailand

The history of art in Thailand covers many periods and regions. Settlement in northern Thailand dates back 500,000 years ago. The early settlers were hunters and gatherers. These settlers used river stones as tools. It was not until around 5,000 years ago that they began to settle in villages, grow crops, and make pottery. Around 2,500 years ago, bronze and iron tools appear.

 Prehistoric Hand Painting

Prehistoric Hand Painting

Around the 1st Century Indian culture began to permeate Thailand. The writing system is based on Indian script. Pali became the language of Buddhism. The basis of law and political administration was based on Indian Dharmasastras. Indian literature influenced theatre, dance, and art. From the 7th to the 11th centuries Dvaravati art was on trend. This kind of art refers to the Mon communities who ruled over Thailand. It was focused on Hinayana Buddhist, Mahayana Buddhist, and Hindu religious objects. The style is influenced by India but local elements were included like Southeast Asian facial features. It was around this time that Buddhist clerics dictated that 32 features be included in any representation of Buddha so that he would be instantly recognizable. Hindu gods differed because they were given kingly status. They were usually portrayed with jewels and crowns.

 Mon Dvaravati Bronze Buddha

Mon Dvaravati Bronze Buddha

Thai Sukhothai, which translates to the dawn of happiness, features mostly sculptures inspired by Theravada Buddhism. This new style celebrated spiritual serenity merged with human form and mainly focused on images of Buddha. The artists worked to feature the compassionate and superhuman nature of Buddha. Sukhothai became famous for ceramics. They were usually dark brown or black and had a clear glaze.

 Sukhothai Period Stucco Buddha At Chaliang

Sukhothai Period Stucco Buddha At Chaliang

From 1350 to 1767 the Ayutthaya Kingdom ruled Thailand. The art works included bronze, woodcarving, stucco, and sandstone. Many of these works were destroyed by Burmese invasions. Later in the 17th century, splendor became fashionable and you begin to see art works featuring Buddha with ornate crowns and robes.

 Ayutthaya Period Black Lacquer

Ayutthaya Period Black Lacquer

Modern Thai art can mostly be found in Bangkok. Many art galleries in Thailand only sell traditional Thai pieces. These kinds of artists are usually influenced by Buddhist beliefs and motives. Some artists are going against the curve and are tackling controversial issues. Silapakorn University is the most reputable art school in Thailand. The school got inspiration from an Italian teacher and artist, Corrado Feroci in the 19th century. Feroci came to Thailand after being invited by the Government in 1923. He decided to stay in Thailand and take on the name Silpa Bhirasri. As a professor he promoted westernization but also tried to preserve traditional Thai arts. [2]

  "Power and Might (after R. Lichtenstein)," Jirapat Tatsanasomboon

 "Power and Might (after R. Lichtenstein)," Jirapat Tatsanasomboon


Morocco

Morocco has a unique artistic history. Morocco was at the center of the Hispano-Moorish architectural movement for almost six centuries (11C-17C). Moroccans are known for ceramics, woodwork, books, textiles, jewelry, and weaponry. The art and culture in Morocco is a huge draw for tourists. The architecture in Morocco has suffered from political disagreements, mainly over religion. There have been several groups set on destroying or hiding palaces and mosques. Under the French Protectorate, there was a movement to preserve buildings in the nation’s cultural capital. This policy, which created the Department of National Monuments, continues today. There are many who are working on restoring older buildings and banning new buildings within the historic center.

Traces of humanity’s distant ancestors, going back about 2 million years, can be found in Morocco. Artistic remnants have been found from the Neolithic and Bronze Ages. Most of these were rock carvings depicting animals, weapons, geometric patterns, and human beings. Many of these carvings are being preserved in the Rabat Archaeological Museum, though some remain in the southern Moroccan mountains. Archeologists believe many pieces from around five centuries ago have been lost due to ransacking or the wares being sold to distant lands. Some fine pottery, possibly of Greek origins, has been found. There is evidence that shows the Romans dominated this area from 40 to 285 AD in the wonderful public buildings. They built forums, basilicas, thermal baths, theaters, and arches. The Roman lifestyle became very popular with local upper classes. They began building spacious houses around an atrium decorated with mosaic floors and murals. Morocco became well known for these beautiful mosaics. Some of them remain in these homes while others have been transferred to museums. Most of the mosaics are black & white or multicolored geometric patterns. Moroccan mosaics differed from other works due to the fact that most of the scenes were based on mythology rather than everyday life.

 Triton in the thermal baths at Banasa

Triton in the thermal baths at Banasa

In the 7th Century, Morocco was invaded by Arab nations who brought Islamic art to the area. In the field of architecture it brought simple spaces decorated by opulent works in stucco, wood carvings, and tiling. These homes were usually surrounded by orchards and pools. The first mosque was built in Morocco around this time and the basic layout has not changed since. Minarets, square-shaped towers, were added to call people to prayer five times a day. These minarets can be decorated with arches, interlacing, or tiling. Madrasah, or colleges of theology, were also built during this time. These buildings generally feature a central fountain, zellij floors, stucco fanlights, and carved cedar wood cornices. Mausoleums for Muslims who had achieved something akin to sainthood by their deaths were built with white domed roofs. The Islamic religion does not like to include representations of humans in artwork, so most decorative art of this time included geometric patterns, floral motifs, and cursive or kufic script.

 Koutoubia Mosque Minaret

Koutoubia Mosque Minaret

The 16th and 17th centuries were dominated by two figures, the Saadian sultan Ahmed el-Mansur at Marrakech and the Alawite, Moulay Ismail at Meknès. Ahmed el-Mansur started a building program to embellish his city, Marrakech. He built a grand palace based on ones in Granada, but it was later torn down to build a new palace. The tombs were left alone until they were discovered in 1917. Archeologists found delicate marble columns, stalactite domes, and stucco lace-work. Though the palaces in Meknès were destroyed, the ruins that remain are very impressive. There was a large movement of Jewish and Muslim immigration during the 16th and 17th centuries that revitalized Moroccan art. The 19th century brought new palaces filled with local arts including painted carpentry, carpets, wall hangings, and copperware. In the 20th century the tradition of this style of art continued when the Hassan II Mosque was built in Casablanca.

 Hassan II Mosque, Casablanca

Hassan II Mosque, Casablanca

In the 20th century, many Europeans moved to Morocco. Architecture began to have a mix of all kinds of styles. General Henri Lyautey became the Resident General in 1912. He was very focused on urban planning. They decided to redesign Casablanca to have new districts with a distinct feel very different from the historic town centers. Wide avenues lined with trees and gardens were introduced. Many worked with this initiative to make sure modern techniques still included some Moroccan style. In the 1920s, the Art Deco style became very popular in Casablanca. In the 1960s, Jean- François Zecavo became famous for his “brutalist architecture” which featured lots of bare concrete. As Morocco has moved into the 21st century, they have managed to combine Moroccan traditions with European modernist trends.[3]  

 Kasbah Tamadot Hotel

Kasbah Tamadot Hotel


Well this journey into the art of different cultures just makes me want to break out my passport. It is so interesting how ancient cultures were so influenced by the countries around them. It is amazing how so many cultures on different parts of the globe progressed forward in a similar fashion. As we continue to progress as a human race hopefully we can use our increasingly connected world to study our different histories and learn from them. We can get inspiration for new kinds of art based on the art forms of ancient civilizations. This will hopefully bring exciting new art forms along with a better understanding for cultures different from our own. There is so much knowledge available at our fingertips, now we just need to get out and explore!

CrEATively Yours,

K

[1] http://www.russia-ic.com/culture_art/visual_arts/170/#.VugmZDHrvIU

[2] http://thailandsworld.com/en/thai-art/index.cfm

[3] http://travel.michelin.com/web/destination/Morocco/history-culture/Art_and_architecture

The Art of Everyday

Sometimes I must remind myself that "art" isn't always this lofty concept. Often times it's the smaller creative endeavors that helps us process, release, celebrate, and express ourselves. As an actor and a poet, I get the chance to explore the grander schemes and heightened moments of human experience. I personally find this exhilarating and cathartic, but they are not the only art forms I know. There are other artistic opportunities that offer to sustain us daily.

Fashion is one of my foremost perpetual creative outlets. Fashion gives me a little inventive challenge everyday (and sometimes multiple times a day). My clothing can be my weapon/my armor/my sigil. It is my belief that personal style deeply affects one's interaction with the world around them. The physical presentation of one's self is equal parts, weapon, identity, and sigil.  I am excited to dress myself everyday. I am thrilled when I am allowed to dress others. When I consider a look for myself or others, I ponder how to take the quintessential and unique and bring it out to be seen and admired. 

I enjoy the power that comes with expression. My swagger expresses my moods, my attitudes, and often times I use my clothing to give myself what I need for the day. High ankle boots, a field vest, and a tunic might feel like armor if I need a little more resolve for a tough day. If I had to dress a bit more conservatively, I might use suspenders and a bowler hat to add a little flare to a sweater and a clean cut trouser combo, just to make sure I have not lost my point of view.

As a man, I must say that discovering my own fashion sense has been tricky. As children, I think  boys are not taught to care about how they look beyond cleanliness. Young men aspire to blend into peer groups and later into the fashion of profession. I always loved being told I looked nice or I looked good. And so my style began to reflect those generic adjectives. My looks had clean lines and classic fits. I pushed no boundaries, played with no extremes, and silhouette never even crossed my mind. My closet reflected the sterilized shelves of mass market menswear.

Until one day I decided I deserved what the women had. I wanted to look like the creative, extroverted, charismatic, confident man that dwelled inside. So, I began to hunt down those pieces that glean attention. I would scavenge for something tailored that would show off my form. I didn't care if the garment was labeled women's. If it fit me and added something novel to my collection of clothing, then it would be mine. I became passionate about cultivating my aesthetic. And you know what? I became that man I wanted to show the world I had inside. My creativity blossomed, my confidence soared, and others took note of it.

Now, I am constantly striving for new and innovative ways to present myself. I crave new and original silhouettes. I try to challenge myself to go beyond the restrictions of "menswear" and instead focus on the wardrobe as a catalyst to let the inner light shine. I encourage you artMEATers out there to amplify your own inner light as well. Perhaps that creative endeavor you've been looking for is just under your nose.

Creatively Yours,

D

The Heroine with a Thousand Faces

Today is International Women’s Day, as most of you know from the memes on your Facebook timeline. To celebrate fantastic international female artists, we decided to feature some of their stories on the artMEAT blog. These women go way beyond mythology. They have tackled more than one beast in their past and persevered to bestow their stories on the world through artistic expression. Let’s take a look at their journeys across the world over.

Kara Walker – (1969 - ) Mixed Media Artist

Kara Walker hails from Stockton, CA. She went to the Atlanta College of Art and graduated with her BFA in 1991. She went on to study at the Rhode Island School of Design where she received her MFA in 1994. Walker’s art explores issues surrounding race, gender, and sexuality. She is well known for creating iconic, silhouetted figures. She takes this traditional Victorian medium and turns it on its head. By placing the silhouettes directly on the walls of the art gallery she turns the space into a more theatrical setting. There is so much movement with her cutout characters that they appear to be reenacting scenes in real time. With her piece “Darkytown Rebellion” (2000) she used overhead projectors to places lights with different colors on the ceiling, walls, and floors of the gallery. All of these lights caught the viewer’s body in their projection and cast the shadow onto the wall to join her characters. Walker blends the realistic aspects of slavery with her fictional stories to pull in but also implicate the viewer.

 Kara Walker, Darkytown Rebellion, 2001, cut paper and projection on wall, 4.3 x 11.3m, (Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean, Luxembourg)

Kara Walker, Darkytown Rebellion, 2001, cut paper and projection on wall, 4.3 x 11.3m, (Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean, Luxembourg)

In 2014, Kara Walker took on a new challenge and created her first ever large-scale public project. She created a large, sugar coated sculpture of a sphinx-like woman inside the Domino Sugar Factory in Brooklyn, NY. She created this piece as a commentary on the building and the history of the sugar trade. The title of the piece, “The Subtlety” is poetry in and of itself. Walker says the piece is, “an homage to the unpaid and overworked Artisans who have refined our sweet tastes from the cane fields to the kitchens of the New World on the occasion of the demolition of the Domino Sugar Refining Plant.”[1]

 Kara Walker, A Subtlety, 2014, sugar coated sculpture, (Domino Sugar Factory Brooklyn, NY)

Kara Walker, A Subtlety, 2014, sugar coated sculpture, (Domino Sugar Factory Brooklyn, NY)

Walker has shown her art at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. In 1997, she received the MacArthur Fellowship and represented the U.S. in Bienal de São Paulo in 2002. She lives in New York and serves on the faculty of the MFA program at Columbia University.[2]


Shirin Neshat (1957 - ) Video & Installation Artist

Shirin Neshat was born in Qazvin, Iran in 1957. She traveled to the U.S. at age 17 to study art. She got her BA, MA, and MFA from the University of California, Berkeley. She returned to Iran in 1990 and found it to be very different from the land she knew before the 1979 Revolution. This shocking revelation is thought to have influenced her work which includes references to memory, loss, and contemporary like in Iran. She uses her artwork to delve into political and social issues in Iran.

 Shirin Nehsat, 1993-1997, Black & White Photography

Shirin Nehsat, 1993-1997, Black & White Photography

In the mid-1990s, she began her “Women of Allah” series. In this series she analyzes conditions of the different identities that make up Iranian and Western cultures including gender, public vs private, and religious vs secular. She has received much acclaim for her work outside of Iran. She has done shows at the Venice Biennale, the Istanbul and Johannesburg Biennials, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, and the Tate Gallery in London. Nehsat is currently residing and working in New York.[3]


Barbara Kruger (1945 - ) American Designer, Graphic Artist, and Photographer

Barbara Kruger grew up in Newark, NJ. She attended Syracuse University for one year and then moved to NYC to take more advanced classes at the Parsons School of Design. After Parsons, Kruger began working in the magazine industry. She worked for House and Garden, Aperture, and Mademoiselle. She became the lead designer at Mademoiselle at age 22. Though she was successful in this field, she wanted to be an artist. In 1973, Marcia Tucker founded the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York and featured some of Kruger’s pieces in an exhibit. Later in the 1970s, Kruger started teaching in Berkeley, CA. She began incorporating written words into her work. She became very interested in poetry. She began creating pieces that mixed poetry and photographs. She also started playing with the spaces in which her work was shown.

 Barbara Kruger, Found Images & Text

Barbara Kruger, Found Images & Text

 After producing a couple of works juxtaposing words with architecture, she began exploring phrases that centered on social power structure, technology, and the human condition. She introduced found images into her work. The pieces were usually from magazines and newspapers. She wanted to explore our “ability to determine who we are and who we aren’t.” Her pieces were commentaries on feminism, consumerism, desire, and personal autonomy. A big shift took place in her work starting in 1991 when her self-titled solo exhibit at the Mary Boone Gallery in New York transitioned into an installation that covered every inch of the gallery’s interior. She said she wanted to create a red, white, and black “arena of hostility.” Kruger was the first female artist to sign with the Mary Boone Gallery. At the time, this gallery was famous for showing macho, neo-expressionist male artists. In the 1990s, Kruger returned to magazine world. She designed covers for The New Republic, Ms., Newsweek, and Esquire. There seems to be a strong sense of irony that her work is being featured in a commercial medium when she is commenting on our consumerist culture.

 Barbara Kruger, Belief & Doubt, 2012, (Hirshhorn Gallery, Washington D.C.)

Barbara Kruger, Belief & Doubt, 2012, (Hirshhorn Gallery, Washington D.C.)

For the last 20 years Kruger’s work has included large scale pieces for museums and public spaces all over the world. She is currently teaching at the University of California, Los Angeles. She has written articles for The New York Time, Artform, and The Village Voice. Kruger co-curated the 51st Venice Biennale, “The Experience of Art,” in 2005. This was the first time the Biennale had been curated by two women. She currently lives in NYC and LA.[4]  

We end this overview with a wish that we could include more. There are so many fantastic female artists around the world and they all have their own unique perspective to share. With all of the issues facing women globally (illiteracy rates, access to clean water, wage inequality) these works of art can have a huge impact in helping each of us step into another woman’s shoes. Walk around for a mile or so in those shoes, see if you notice anything different from your everyday perspective. It may change some minds and hopefully it will change some policies so half the population on this planet can feel a bit more equal. "Because how history is written, both in and out of art institutions, is how you shape the world. “ - Judy Chicago

CrEATively Yours,

K


[1] http://creativetime.org/projects/karawalker/

[2] http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/kara-walker

[3] http://www.artnet.com/artists/shirin-neshat/biography

[4] http://www.theartstory.org/artist-kruger-barbara.htm

Super Campaign Art Tuesday

It looks like the internet has been taken over by politics, so artMEAT is jumping on this bandwagon to take a look at campaign poster art throughout American History. It is fascinating to see how slogans, artwork, and the ideas behind the posters were shaped by the politics and art styles of the time. Let’s take a look:

Andrew Jackson vs. Henry Clay, 1832: Henry Clay who ran against Jackson for his second term wanted to try a new approach to defeating this “Man of the People.” He decided to portray Jackson as a King. This campaign did not do much to take down Andrew Jackson’s every man appeal. Early campaign posters were black & white and usually contained a large portrait and a short slogan. In this case Clay decided to feature Jackson and use the slogan “King Andrew the First.”[1]

Abraham Lincoln vs. Stephen Douglas, 1860: This election is famous for a series of debates featuring the two opponents. Lincoln delivered such an amazing performance at these debates that he became instantly famous and his image was everywhere. El Biejo Onesto Abe cigarettes began using his image on their products without his permission. Lincoln went on to win this election by a huge margin. This is not a campaign poster but it shows how important popularity has been in American politics.[2]

Robert F. Kennedy, 1968: The 60’s were a turbulent time for American politics. During this primary season, LBJ and RFK had quite the feud brewing. Some believe LBJ withdrew from the 1968 race because he thought Bobby would win by a landslide. This poster nods to the psychedelic art of the 60s and paints RFK as the groovy choice.  RFK was very popular with young people and his campaign was looking very promising when he won in California on June 4th. His death along with those of his brother, JFK, and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. put an end to the progressive 1960s and took all of the momentum out of the Democratic race, leading Richard Nixon to win over Hubert Humphrey.[3]

Ronald Reagan vs. Walter Mondale, 1984: When Walter Mondale decided to take on Ronald Reagan for his second term he thought a tribute to the Romanticism of Delacroix would help him beat the incumbent. It is an interesting choice to put the candidate in the background and include his choice for Vice President, Geraldine Ferraro, as the leader. This did not prove to be the best choice as Ronald Reagan beat Mondale in a landslide.[4]

George W. Bush vs. John Kerry, 2004: Looking more like a movie poster, this campaign poster attempts to simplify the candidate. George Walker Bush became “Dubya.” This was an effort to make his opponent, John Kerry look elitist. The strategy may have worked because George W Bush went on to beat John Kerry by 35 electoral votes.[5]

Barack Obama vs. John McCain, 2008: No list of Presidential campaign posters would be complete without the “Hope” poster by Graffiti artist Shepard Fairey. He is quoted as saying, “there were a lot of people who were digging Obama but they didn’t have any way to symbolically show their support.” This poster became widely popular, appearing in all kinds of forms during the campaign. NPR’s Brooke Gladstone described the poster as, “uncluttered…it contains a message of the purest kind…it managed the stunning feat of portraying a black presidential candidate while visually overcoming the ‘otherness’ of being black in America.” It led to an extremely successful campaign where Barack Obama beat John McCain by 192 electoral votes.[6]

As we wrap up this post, we here at artMEAT hope everyone has either already voted, is voting today, or will be voting in the future. We can express ourselves through art, but we can also have our voices heard at the polling place. Make sure yours is counted.

Until next time!

CrEATively Yours,

K

[1] http://www.thedailybeast.com/galleries/2012/05/25/11-best-u-s-presidential-campaign-posters-of-all-time.html#slide_9

[2] http://www.thedailybeast.com/galleries/2012/05/25/11-best-u-s-presidential-campaign-posters-of-all-time.html#slide_8

[3] http://www.thedailybeast.com/galleries/2012/05/25/11-best-u-s-presidential-campaign-posters-of-all-time.html#slide_5

[4] http://www.thedailybeast.com/galleries/2012/05/25/11-best-u-s-presidential-campaign-posters-of-all-time.html#slide_1

[5] http://www.thedailybeast.com/galleries/2012/05/25/11-best-u-s-presidential-campaign-posters-of-all-time.html#slide

[6] http://www.thedailybeast.com/galleries/2012/05/25/11-best-u-s-presidential-campaign-posters-of-all-time.html#slide_0

Missed the artMEAT Deadline?

Did you get distracted by the blindingly white Oscars, Donald Trump’s hair, or the fabulous artMEAT blog post on historical African-American artists? We have all been there. artMEAT still wants to work with you, so we are giving y’all a bit more time. Please hit the handy dandy submit button below and share your “Never Have I Ever” hopes, fears, and/or stories. We will be accepting submissions through Monday, March 7th.

We would like to make a special appeal to all of you typewriter jockeys out there. We want to feature more literary works. Do you know a budding poet? Are you a fantastic short story teller? Put that pen to paper and let us see your favorite type of font! We want to find the next great American (or British, Ugandan, Russian, etc.) novelist.

Please send any and all questions to thisisartmeat@gmail.com. Thanks Peeps!

Celebrating African-American Artists

In honor of Black History Month this blog post is dedicated to the talented African-American artists of the past. Artists have a unique opportunity to share his or her voice, story, or idea through creative expression. These works are often a better method to get people to understand your message since they appeal to our basic human appreciation for beautiful music, eye catching color, or linguistic ingenuity. People of color have not had the same opportunities as white people to have their voice heard so these artists have had to work against incredible odds to share their story. It is a testament to their strength, talent, and dedication that they got their work out into the world. For these reasons and more, we celebrate them today.

                Edmonia Lewis: Artist, Sculptor (c. 1844 – c. 1907) – Noted as the first professional African-American and Native-American sculptor, Edmonia Lewis was a highly praised artist whose work centered around religious and classical themes. She was born in Greenbush, New York. Her early work started with plaster medallions of famous abolitionist leaders. Her first big success came when she created a bust of Colonel Robert Gould Shaw. Colonel Shaw died leading the all-black 54th Massachusetts Regiment.  She was able to buy a ticket to Rome, Italy to study sculpting with marble through the sales of copies of this famous bust. Her most famous work is titled, “The Death of Cleopatra.” She showed it at the Philadelphia Exposition in 1876 and in Chicago in 1878. Unfortunately, the work was so heavy she was not able to bring it back with her to Italy. It was thought to be lost but was found several decades after her death. Her works are part of the permanent collections of the Howard University Gallery of Art and the Smithsonian American Art Museum.[1]

 “The Death of Cleopatra” by Edmonia Lewis

“The Death of Cleopatra” by Edmonia Lewis


                Augusta Savage: Artist, Civil Rights Activist, Sculptor, Educator (1892-1962) – Augusta Savage was born in Green Cove Springs, Florida. She started her career as an artist by using the natural clay found in her neighborhood to make figurines. Her father did not approve of her art and made several attempts to stop her. Savage was once quoted as saying he, “almost whipped all the art out of me.” She moved to New York City in the early 1920s where she studied at Cooper Union. In 1923 she applied to a program to study art in France. She was rejected due to her race. In response she sent letters to media outlets to make the discriminatory practices public. Many newspapers covered the story but the committee did not change their decision. Savage found some success making busts of famous African-Americans such as W. E. B. Du Bois and Marcus Garvey. She is considered to be a prominent artist of the Harlem Renaissance. She did eventually get to study in Paris when she was awarded the Julius Rosenwald fellowship in 1929. She went on to establish her own studio in NYC and helped found the Harlem Artists’ Guild. She was commissioned to create a piece for the 1939 World’s Fair in New York. She created “The Harp,” a 16 foot tall work featuring 12 African-Americans as the strings of the harp. There is a kneeling young man offering music in his hands. Sadly, the work was destroyed after the World’s Fair. In her later life she settled in the country and taught children in summer camps.[2]   

 “The Harp” by Augusta Savage

“The Harp” by Augusta Savage


                Jacob Lawrence: Academic, Painter (1917-2000) – Jacob Lawrence is the most widely acclaimed African-American artist of the 20th century. He is most famous for his “Migration Series” and “War Series.” He used these works to bring African-American experiences to life. Lawrence grew up in Harlem in New York City. He graduated from the American Artists School in 1939 and afterwards received funding from the Works Progress Administration Federal Art Project. At this time he had already developed his own form of modernism and worked in narrative series. He would produce 30 or more paintings on one subject. His “Migration Series” was exhibited at Edith Halpert’s Downtown Gallery in 1942. Lawrence was the first African-American artist to be displayed at the gallery. During WWII Lawrence was drafted. He was asked to document his experience of war around the world through art. He produced 48 paintings but unfortunately all of them have been lost. When he returned home he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and he painted his “War Series.” In 1951, he began a series based on performances at the Apollo Theater in Harlem. In 1971, he accepted a tenured position to teach at the University of Washington in Seattle. He spent the rest of his life painting commissions. Most of them were limited editions to help fund noble causes for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, the Children’s Defense Fund, and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. He also painted murals for the Harold Washington Center in Chicago, the University of Washington, Howard University, and a 72 foot mural for NYC’s Times Square subway station.[3]

 Part of “The Migration Series” by Jacob Lawrence

Part of “The Migration Series” by Jacob Lawrence

 Part of “The War Series” by Jacob Lawrence

Part of “The War Series” by Jacob Lawrence


                Jean-Michel Basquiat: Painter (1960-1988) – Jean-Michel Basquiat was born in Brooklyn, NY. He had a Haitian-American Father and a Puerto Rican Mother. He found inspiration in his cultural heritage. Basquiat began drawing at an early age using the sheets of paper his father, an accountant, would bring home from work. His mother was very supportive of his work. He began doing graffiti around NYC in the late 1970s under the name “SAMO.” He sold sweatshirts and postcards with his artwork on the street to fund his work. In 1980 his work was included in a group show. He received critical acclaim for his fusion of words, symbols, stick figures, and animals. He skyrocketed to fame, soon being able to sell certain pieces for $50,000. He was included in a new art movement call Neo-Expressionism that featured lots of young, experimental artists. In the mid-1980s, Basquiat worked with pop artist Andy Warhol. They did a show together featuring corporate logos and cartoon characters. Basquiat continued to show his work around the world. In 1986, he went to Africa to do a show in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. In this same year he showed almost 60 paintings at the Kestner-Gesellschaft Gallery in Hanover, Germany. He was the youngest artist to exhibit his work there. Though his art career did not last long, he has been credited with bringing the African-American and Latino experience to the elite art world.[4]

 “Scull” by Jean-Michel Basquiat

“Scull” by Jean-Michel Basquiat


                Gordon Parks: Pianist, Director, Photographer, Songwriter, Writer (1912-2006) – Gordon Parks was born in Fort Scott, Kansas in 1912. He was a self-taught artist and went on to be the first African-American photographer for Life and Vogue magazines. Parks attended a segregated elementary school and faced intense discrimination as a child. He was not allowed to participate in many activities at his high school and his teachers discouraged higher education. Inspired by photographs of migrant workers in a magazine, he bought a camera when he was 25. Marva Louis, wife of boxer Joe Lewis, saw some of his early work and encouraged him to move to a bigger city. After moving to Chicago, Parks began taking pictures of low-income neighborhoods on the South Side. In 1941, Parks received a fellowship from the Farm Security Administration (FSA) for his photographs. During this time, he took one of his most famous works, “American Gothic, Washington D.C.” This work featured someone from the FSA cleaning crew with an American flag in the background. When Parks was hired to be a freelance photographer for Vogue he became famous for shots involving more motion than the usual static fashion poses. After moving to Harlem, he began a photographic essay on a Harlem gang leader. This won him a position with Life magazine. He worked there for 20 years covering all kinds of subjects. He also took portraits of African-Americans leaders including Malcolm X, Stokely Carmichael, and Muhammed Ali. In 1962 he wrote an autobiographical novel called The Learning Tree. He published a number of books over the course of his lifetime. In 1969, Parks became the first African-American director of a major Hollywood movie, the film adaptation of The Learning Tree. He wrote the screenplay for the film and composed the score. His next film, “Shaft" was one of the highest grossing films of 1971. Parks continued to make films for television. Parks is remembered for being a pioneer in the photography field. He is quoted as saying, “People in millenniums ahead will know what we were like in the 1930’s...this is as important for historic reasons as any other.”[5] 

 “American Gothic, Washington, D.C.” by Gordon Parks

“American Gothic, Washington, D.C.” by Gordon Parks

 “Ethel Shariff in Chicago, 1963” by Gordon Parks

“Ethel Shariff in Chicago, 1963” by Gordon Parks

I am sad to say that I was not familiar with many of these artists before researching this post. These works are truly engaging and significant. It is also worth considering the incredible struggle these men and women endured to share their voices with the world. artMEAT is excited to shine light on works from a diverse group of artists. We will always strive to keep our minds, ears, eyes, and hearts open for art to help us understand the paths of one another.

CrEATively Yours,

K

[1] http://www.biography.com/people/edmonia-lewis-9381053

[2] http://www.biography.com/people/augusta-savage-40495#profile

[3] http://www.biography.com/people/jacob-lawrence-9375562#teaching-and-commissions

[4] http://www.biography.com/people/jean-michel-basquiat-185851#commercial-success

[5] http://www.biography.com/people/gordon-parks-37379#synopsis

Insights Behind the Camera's Lens

Hello World! In an attempt to delve deeper into the artMEAT world, we would like to take a peek into the lives of our contributors. We are going to get down and dirty with our fabulous photographer from the “where the Serpents come” artMEAT collaboration piece in issue Ø, Maureen Delaney. Since Maureen is a woman of many talents, she also wrote the poem “premature” in the issue.

Upon meeting, Delanté G. Keys (Artistic Director of artMEAT) and Maureen immediately hit it off. Once he discovered she was a photographer, he was very excited to get to work on the artMEAT collaboration to bring his poem on a creation myth to life.  Maureen showed up with a clear vision, some amazing techniques, and incredible directing skills.

I reached out to Maureen with a series of questions to learn more about her background. She was kind enough to indulge yet another request from the artMEAT crew. Here is how the interview went down:

1) Who are you and what do you do?

My name is Maureen Delaney and I live in Austin with my twelve year old and nine year old kids. For my day job, I am a server. I love to create through photography, drawing, painting, sewing, knitting, writing, gardening, and cooking. I dance with the Austin Samba School, and this year I would like to branch into acting as well.

2) What’s your background?

I was born in Omaha Nebraska, as the firstborn to my college professor dad and homemaker mom. I have one brother who is three years younger. I lived in Omaha until I was 9, then Bloomington, Illinois until the age of 14. I went to high school outside of Philadelphia and then I moved to Brooklyn, where I graduated from the Pratt Institute. I worked as a professional printer and taught elementary ESL in the South Bronx. After living for 8 years in New York, I moved to Austin 11 years ago.

3) Do you remember a particular moment in your life that inspired you?

I remember the first time I got my own disposable camera, when I was 12. I started to fall in love with photography then.

4) Have you ever been inspired by food, a drink, or a song?

Music inspires me hugely as a dancer. I love music and am always listening to it, but I am not sure how much it sparks ideas for visual art for me.

5) Do you have a dream project?

Stepping into a painting studio completely set up with oils and huge canvases...

6) What is your favorite or most inspirational place?

One of my favorite spots in Austin is Campbell's Hole on the Greenbelt.

7) What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given?

Don't ever be afraid to make mistakes, because you learn more from mistakes than you do from successes.

8) What advice or tips would you like to share with others who are thinking about working with artMEAT?

Do it! Submit your work!

I have to give a big shout out to Maureen for sharing her gifts, time, and smiles with us. We were damn lucky to get her participation in issue Ø, and we look forward to working with her in the future.

If you or someone you know wants to contribute, we are eagerly waiting to see what you have got. We did not bribe Maureen for her endorsement above so I would take it to heart. If you would like to be included in our upcoming issue focusing on the idea of “Never Have I Ever” please check out our Submit page. If you are interested in subscribing to artMEAT, please click the button below. We look forward to meeting new artists and fostering collaborations with our growing artist collective. Please feel free to shoot any questions to thisisartmeat@gmail.com.

Until next time fellow artMEATERs!

CrEATiverly Yours,

K

Calling all ARTs to the Dance Floor!

Issue Ø has been devoured and we all know what everyone is thinking, “What’s next?” With that in mind we would like to announce the call for contributors for issue 1 of artMEAT. The theme of this issue is “Never Have I Ever.”

Who’s hungry?

“Never Have I Ever” is a game that offers its players the chance to consider, analyze, and explore barriers while bonding more closely with the other participants. It challenges the very capacity of our accomplishments and experiences. It leaves us questioning: What limitations have we put on ourselves? What risks would we like to take in the future? Who else has had similar exploits?

artMEAT is enlisting you to delve into the world of unfulfilled possibility for its upcoming issue 1. What hasn’t happened yet? What mold haven’t you broken? We are interested in all artistic personifications of this theme. Don’t be shy. We want to feature that cake, collage, and toenail mosaic.

So come one, come all! Check out the link below to our submissions page. We are asking for all submissions by March 1st. If you have any comments or questions, don’t be afraid to shout! We are also very interested in setting up some artMEAT blind dates! This is where an artist from one discipline creates a work in conjunction with another artist from a differing field. So, if you would like to work with a tattoo artist, an architect, a pastel art enthusiast, please let us know about any ideas for collaboration and we will work to facilitate this work.

We cannot wait to see what you all have been cooking!

CrEATively Yours,

K